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Tropic of Cancer[北回归线][En/Cn]

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第3节

我不在家时窗帘挂上了,它们看起来像在来苏水里浸过的奥地利蒂罗尔州出产的桌布。屋里光芒四射,我迷迷糊糊地坐在床上,想着人类诞生前是什么样子。突然钟声响了,这是一种稀奇古怪、绝非人世的曲调,我仿佛被带到了中亚的大草原上。有些曲子缕缕不绝、余音绕梁,有些则一倾而出,缠绵悱恻。如今一切又都归于寂静,只有最后一个音符仍在飘荡,这只是一只微弱的高音锣,响了一声便像一个人苗一样熄灭了,它几乎无法划破这静谧的夜。

In my absence the window curtains have been hung. They have the appearance of Tyrolean tablecloths dipped in lysol. The room sparkles. I sit on the bed in a daze, thinking about man before his birth. Suddenly bells begin to toll, a weird, unearthly music, as if I had been translated to the steppes of Central Asia. Some ring out with a long, lingering roll, some erupt drunkenly, maudlinly. And now it is quiet again, except for a last note that barely grazes the silence of the night – just a faint, high gong snuffed out like a flame.

 

  我曾跟自己订立了一个无言的契约:写过的东西不再改动一行。我对完善自己的思想或行动并无兴趣,我把陀思妥耶夫斯基的完美与屠格涅夫的完美等量齐观(还有什么比《永久的丈夫》更完美的?)。于是,在同一环境中,我们有了两类完美。然而在凡高的信中还提到一种超出这两类完美的完美,这便是个人战胜了艺术。

I have made a silent compact with myself not to change a line of what I write. I am not interested in perfecting my thoughts, nor my actions. Beside the perfection of Turgenev I put the perfection of Dostoevski. (Is there anything more perfect than The Eternal Husband?) Here, then, in one and the same medium, we have two kinds of perfection. But in Van Gogh's letters there is a perfection beyond either of these. It is the triumph of the individual over art.

  

  现在只有一件事使我极感兴趣,这就是记下书中遗漏的一切,就我所知,还没有人利用空气来给我们的生活指示方向,提供动机的各种元素,只有杀人狂似乎在从生活中重新汲取一定量的他们早先投入生活中的东西。这个时代呼唤暴力,可我们只得到了失效的炸药。革命不是尚在萌芽中便被扼杀就是成功得太快。激情很快便丧失殆尽,人们便转而求助于思想,这已是常规。提出来的建议没有一项能维持二十四小时以上。我们要在一代人生活的这段时间里生活一百万次,在对昆虫学、深海生物或细胞活动的研究中,我们学到更多……

There is only one thing which interests me vitally now, and that is the recording of all that which is omitted in books. Nobody, so far as I can see, is making use of those elements in the air which gives direction and motivation to our lives. Only the killers seem to be extracting from life some satisfactory measure of what they are putting into it. The age demands violence, but we are getting only abortive explosions. Revolutions are nipped in the bud, or else succeed too quickly. Passion is quickly exhausted. Men fall back on ideas, comme d'habitude. Nothing is proposed that can last more than twenty-four hours. We are living a million lives in the space of a generation. In the study of entomology, or of deep sea life, or cellular activity, we derive more …

 

电话铃声打断了我的思绪,我永远无法把这件事情想清楚。有人来租这所公寓了……

The telephone interrupts this thought which I should never have been able to complete. Someone is coming to rent the apartment….

 

  看来我在波勒兹别墅的生活要结束了,好吧,我就收拾起这些手稿走路好了,别处也会发生一些事情。事情总是在发生,不论我走到哪里,那儿总有戏看。人就像虱子一样,他们钻到你皮肤下面,躲藏在那儿。于是你搔了又搔,直到搔出血来,可还是无法永远摆脱虱子的骚扰。在我所到之处,人们都在把自个儿的生活弄得一团糟,人人都有难言的隐痛。厄运、无聊、忧伤和自杀,这些都是从娘胎里带来的。四周的气氛中弥漫着灾难、挫折和徒劳无功。搔吧,搔吧,直到一块好皮肤也不剩。这结果令我兴奋不已,我不但不灰心丧气,反而很开心。我高声呼唤更多。更大的灾难和更惨重的失败,我要叫全世界乱成一团,我要叫每个人都把自己搔死。

It looks as though it were finished, my life at the Villa Borghese. Well, I'll take up these pages and move on. Things will happen elsewhere. Things are always happening. It seems wherever I go there is drama. People are like lice – they get under your skin and bury themselves there. You scratch and scratch until the blood comes, but you can't get permanently deloused. Everywhere I go .people are making a mess of their lives. Everyone has his private tragedy. It's in the blood now – misfortune, ennui, grief, suicide. The atmosphere is saturated with disaster, frustration, futility. Scratch and scratch – until there's no skin left. However, the effect upon me is exhilarating. Instead of being discouraged, or depressed, I enjoy it. I am crying for more and more disasters, for bigger calamities, for grander failures. I want the whole world to be out of whack, I want everyone to scratch himself to death.

 

  连这些支离破碎的笔记我几乎都没有时间记,因为我是被人逼迫过着节奏快而又忙乱的生活的呀。来过电话后,一位先生和他太太来了,在他们谈话期间我上楼去躺下来,我躺着,盘算下一步该怎么办。当然不能回到那个妖怪的床上整夜翻来覆去用大脚趾头弹面包屑。这个令人作呕的小杂种;若是还有比当妖怪更糟糕的那便是当个守财奴。他是一个胆小如鼠、战战兢兢的小混蛋,总是在怕有朝一日破产的恐惧中过日子—或许是三月十八日,准确日子却是五月二十五日。他喝咖啡不要牛奶或糖,吃面包不涂黄油,吃肉不要汤,要不就干脆不吃肉。

So fast and furiously am I compelled to live now that there is scarcely time to record even these fragmentary notes. After the telephone call, a gentleman and his wife arrived. I went upstairs to lie down during the transaction. Lay there wondering what my next move would be. Surely not to go back to the fairy's bed and toss about all night flicking bread crumbs with my toes. That puking little bastard! If there's anything worse than being a fairy it's being a miser. A timid, quaking little bugger who lived in constant fear of going broke some day – the 18th of March perhaps, or the 25th of May precisely. Coffee without milk or sugar. Bread without butter. Meat without gravy, or no meat at all.

 

  他不是不要这个便是不要那个,这个肮脏的小财迷。哪一天你打开抽屉瞧瞧便会发现藏在钱匣子里的钱,足足有两千多法郎,还有一些没有兑现过的支票。就算这样,我本来也不会这么在乎的,若不是我的贝雷帽里总是被他倒进咖啡渣子,地板上堆满了垃圾,更不用说那冰冷的润肤膏、油腻腻的毛巾和总是塞住的下水道了。我告诉你,这个小杂种身上总有一股臭味,除非是刚刚洒过科伦香水。他的耳朵脏、眼睛脏,屁股也脏。他是一个大关节、有哮喘病,有虱子、卑微而又病态十足的家伙。

Without this and without that! That dirty little miser! Open the bureau drawer one day and find money hidden away in a sock. Over two thousand francs – and checks that he hadn't even cashed. Even that I wouldn't have minded so much if there weren't always Coffee grounds in my beret and garbage on the floor, to say nothing of the cold cream jars and the greasy towels and the sink always stopped up. I tell you, the little bastard he smelled bad – except when he doused himself with cologne. His ears were dirty, his eyes were dirty, his ass was dirty. He was double jointed, asthmatic, lousy, picayune, morbid.

 

  哪怕他曾给我端来过一顿像样的早饭我也会原谅他的全部缺点的!这个家伙在一只脏兮兮的钱匣子里藏着两千法郎,却拒绝穿件干净衬衣,舍不得在面包上涂点儿黄油。这样一个家伙还不只是妖怪,不只是守财奴—他简直是一个白痴。

I could have forgiven him everything if only he had handed me a decent breakfast! But a man who has two thousand francs hidden away in a dirty sock and refuses to wear a clean shirt or smear a little butter over his bread, such a man is not just a fairy, nor even just a miser – he's an imbecile!

 

  不过有关这个妖怪的都是题外话。我竖着一只耳朵倾听楼下的动静,来人是一位和他妻子一道来看房子的雷恩先生,他们正在谈论要把它租下来呢。谢天谢地,他们还只是说说而已。

But that's neither here nor there, about the fairy. I'm keeping an ear open as to what's going on downstairs. It's a Mr. Wren and his wife who have called to look at the apartment. They're talking about taking it. Only talking about it, thank God.

 

 

  雷恩太太爱笑,这表明马上会出麻烦的。这会儿是雷恩先生在说话,他的声音沙哑,刺耳、深沉,犹如一件又重又钝的武器砍进肉,骨头和软骨里。

Mrs. Wren has a loose laugh – complications ahead. Now Mister Wren is talking. His voice is raucous, scraping, booming, a heavy blunt weapon that wedges its way through flesh and bone and cartilage.

 

  鲍里斯叫我下来好介绍我同他们认识,他搓着双手,像个开当铺的。他们正在谈雷恩先生写的一个故事,一匹破马的故事。

Boris calls me down to be introduced. He is rubbing his hands, like a pawnbroker. They are talking about a story Mr. Wren wrote, a story about a spavined horse.

 

  “我还以为雷恩先生是位画家呢。”

"But I thought Mr. Wren was a painter?"

 

  “当然是,”鲍里斯眨了一下眼睛说。”不过到了冬天他便写作了,他写得不错……好极了。”

"To be sure," says Boris, with a twinkle in his eye, "but in the wintertime he writes. And he writes well … remarkably well."

 

  我想引雷恩先生讲话,讲点什么,讲什么都行。如果有必要,也可以讲讲那匹跛马。可雷恩先生几乎一言不发,每一回他试图讲动笔写作的那段枯燥日子时,他的话便变得难懂了。他往往要花上几个月工夫才在纸上写下一个字。(冬天只有三个月。)这几个月和冬天那几个月里他在思考什么?天理良心,我真看不出这家伙是个作家,可雷恩太太说,他一坐下灵感便纷至沓来。

I try to induce Mr. Wren to talk, to say something, anything, to talk about the spavined horse, if necessary. But Mr. Wren is almost inarticulate. When he essays to speak of those dreary months with the pen he becomes unintelligible. Months and months he spends before setting a word to paper. (And there are only three months of winter!) What does he cogitate all those months and months of winter? So help me God, I can't see this guy as a writer. Yet Mrs. Wren says that when he sits down to it the stuff just pours out.

 

  话题在变换,很难了解雷恩先生在想什么,因为他不说话。

The talk drifts. It is difficult to follow Mr. Wren's mind because he says nothing.

 

  而雷恩太太却说,“他边想边干。”在雷恩太太口中,雷恩先生样样都很好。”他边想边干”—非常可爱,可爱极了,博罗夫斯基准会这么说。不过也实在非常痛苦,尤其是,这位思想家只不过是一匹跛马。

He thinks as he goes along – so Mrs. Wren puts it. Mrs. Wren puts everything about Mr. Wren in the loveliest light. "He thinks as he goes along" – very charming, charming indeed, as Borowski would say, but really very painful, particularly when the thinker is nothing but a spavined horse.

 

  鲍里斯给我钱,叫我去买白酒。去买酒的路上我便已经醉了,我知道自己一回到屋里便会如何表现。沿着那条街走过来时酒劲儿便发了,我早拟好了一篇漂亮的演说词,它像雷恩太太的傻笑,就要滔滔不绝地涌出口来,照我看,她也已有几分醉意了,她一喝醉便会留神听别人说。刚从酒店里出来,我便听见汩汩的撒尿声,一切都在发狂,在四处乱溅,我要雷恩太太听着……

Boris hands me money to buy liquor. Going for the liquor I am already intoxicated. I know just how I'll begin when I get back to the house. Walking down the street it commences, the grand speech inside me that's gurgling like Mrs. Wren's loose laugh. Seems to me she had a slight edge on already. Listens beautifully when she's tight. Coming out of the wine shop I hear the urinal gurgling. Everything is loose and splashy. I want Mrs. Wren to listen…

 

鲍里斯又在搓手,雷恩太太仍在结结巴巴地飞溅着唾沫星子说话。我把一个酒瓶夹在两腿间,把开瓶塞的钻子钻进去,雷恩太太大张着嘴期待着。酒从我两腿间溅出来,阳光也从八角窗外溅进屋来,而我的血也在血管中沸腾,将要从我身体里一涌而出的上千种发疯的玩艺儿现在都混杂在一起了。我把自己想起的每一件事讲给他们听,这些事情原先都藏在我心灵深处,而雷恩太太的狂笑使我开口全说出来了。两腿间夹着酒瓶,阳光由窗外洒进来,这会儿我又重新体验到刚到巴黎时捱过的那段寒酸日子里所感受到的快活心境,当时我茫然不知所措,一贫如洗,像在宴会上徘徊的一个鬼魂那样在街上逛来逛去。每件往事又突然全部想起来了—不能使用的卫生间、那位赞成擦皮鞋的王子、辉煌影院,我在那儿躺在老板的大衣上睡过觉,那个窗子上的铁栅、叫人窒息的感觉、肥大的蟑螂,偶尔的一顿大吃大喝、即将消失在暮色苍茫中的罗斯,坎那克和那不勒斯。我常空着肚子在大街上东跑西颠,有时也去拜访素不相识的人,例如德洛姆夫人。至于怎样到德洛姆夫人家去的,我再也想不起来了,可我去了,还设法进去了,我穿着灯芯绒裤子和猎装,裤子门襟上一个扣子也没有扣便从管家和系着一条小白围裙的女佣人身边闯进屋子里去了。直至今日我仍能感觉到那个房间里金碧辉煌的气氛,德洛姆夫人身着男人气的衣服坐在一只宝座上,鱼缸里养着金鱼,还有古代的世界地图和装订精美的书籍。我仍能感觉到她沉重的手搭在我的肩膀上,她那色迷迷的态度叫我有点害怕。更舒适的是在圣拉扎尔车站往下灌浓炖肉汤,妓女们都站在门口,每张桌子上都摆着塞尔查矿泉水瓶子,一股很浓的精液在裤裆里泛滥。五点到七点间最好的消遣莫过于置身于这一大群人中,紧跟着一条大腿或一个美丽的酥胸往前走,脑子里乱哄哄的,一个个念头接瞳而至。这是那时一种稀奇古怪的满足,那时没有约会,没人请吃饭,没有计划,没有钱。那真是黄金般的日子,我连一个朋友也没有。

Boris is rubbing his hands again. Mr. Wren is still stuttering and spluttering. I have a bottle between my legs and I'm shoving the corkscrew in. Mrs. Wren has her mouth parted expectantly. The wine is splashing between my legs, the sun is splashing through the bay window, and inside my veins there is a bubble and splash of a thousand crazy things that commence to gush out of me now pell mell. I'm telling them everything that comes to mind, everything that was bottled up inside me and which Mrs. Wren's loose laugh has somehow released. With that bottle between my legs and the sun splashing through the window I experience once again the splendor of those miserable days when I first arrived in Paris, a bewildered, poverty stricken individual who haunted the streets like a ghost at a banquet. Everything comes back to me in a rush – the toilets that wouldn't work, the prince who shined my shoes, the Cinema Splendide where I slept on the patron's overcoat, the bars in the window, the feeling of suffocation, the fat cockroaches, the drinking and carousing that went on between times, Rose Cannaque and Naples dying in the sunlight. Dancing the streets on an empty belly and now and then calling on strange people – Madame Delorme, for instance. How I ever got to Madame Delorme's, I can't imagine any more. But I got there, got inside somehow, past the butler, past the maid with her little white apron, got right inside the palace with my corduroy trousers and my hunting jacket – and not a button on my fly. Even now I can taste again the golden ambiance of that room where Madame Delorme sat upon a throne in her mannish rig, the goldfish in the bowls, the maps of the ancient world, the beautifully bound books; I can feel again her heavy hand resting upon my shoulder, frightening me a little with her heavy Lesbian air. More comfortable down below in that thick stew pouring into the Gare St. Lazare, the whores in the doorways, seltzer bottles on every table; a thick tide of semen flooding the gutters. Nothing better between five and seven than to be pushed around in that throng, to follow a leg or a beautiful bust, to move along with the tide and everything whirling in your brain. A weird sort of contentment in those days. No appointments, no invitations for dinner, no program, no dough. The golden period, when I had not a single friend.

 

  每天早上我拖着疲惫的步子去美国捷运公司,每天早上都从办事员那儿得到那个不可避免的答复。于是我像臭虫一样东跑西颠,时不时地捡几个香烟屁股,有时偷偷地捡,有时又腆着脸公开捡。有时我坐在长椅上勒紧裤腰带止住饥饿的折磨,有时穿过杜伊勒利花园,边望着那粗笨的塑像边勃起一回。或是夜间沿着塞纳河漫步,这儿逛逛,那儿逛逛,力它的美姿发狂—两岸的树木,水中破碎的倒影,桥上该死的灯泡照耀下湍急的水流,女人们睡在门廊里,睡在报纸上,睡在雨里,到处都有散发着一股霉味的大教堂门廊,到处都有乞丐、虱子和充斥着圣维德斯舞会的丑八怪女人。在小巷里,手推车像酒桶一样堆放在一起,市场上弥漫着草莓的气味,老教堂四周都种着菜。闪烁着蓝色的弧光,贫民区堆满了垃圾,很滑,脚穿缎子舞鞋的女人们痛饮了一夜后在这些污物和害虫上跌跌撞撞地走过去。

Each morning the dreary walk to the American Express, and each morning the inevitable answer from the clerk. Dashing here and there like a bedbug, gathering butts now and then, sometimes furtively, sometimes brazenly; sitting down on a bench and squeezing my guts to stop the gnawing, or walking through the Jardin des Tuileries and getting an erection looking at the dumb statues. Or wandering along the Seine at night, wandering and wandering, and going mad with the beauty of it, the trees leaning to, the broken images in the water, the rush of the current under the bloody lights of the bridges, the women sleeping in doorways, sleeping on newspapers, sleeping in the rain; everywhere the musty porches of the cathedrals and beggars and lice and old hags full of St. Vitus' dance; pushcarts stacked up like wine barrels in the side streets, the smell of berries in the market place and the old church surrounded with vegetables and blue arc lights, the gutters slippery with garbage and women in satin pumps staggering through the filth and vermin at the end of an all night souse.

 

  还有圣绪尔比斯广场,又宁静又空旷,每天夜里临近午夜时分便有一个拎着一把散了架的雨散戴着古怪面纱的女人到那儿去。每天夜里她都撑着伞睡在一条长椅上,伞骨已掉下来,她的衣服已变成绿色的,她的手指又细又瘦,身上散发出一种霉烂的味道。到了早晨,我本人便要坐在那儿,在阳光下安安静静睡一觉,一面还要诅咒那些该死的鸽子,它们到处觅面包渣吃。圣绪尔比斯啊!那硕大的钟楼、贴在门上的花花绿绿的广告,以及楼内点燃的蜡烛。这便是阿纳托尔•法朗士如此热爱过的圣绪尔比斯。在这儿,神坛上传来嗡嗡的祈祷声,喷泉中水花四溅,鸽子在咕咕叫,面包屑一眨眼工夫便不见了,而我饥肠辘辘的肚子里却发出了单调的隆隆声。我在这儿一天又一天地坐下去,想着杰曼和她在巴士底广场附近住过的那条脏兮兮的小街,而神坛后面仍不断传来嗡嗡的祈祷声,公共汽车呼啸着从身边驶过。太阳晒化柏油,柏油又对我和杰曼产生了影响,对柏油本身和钟楼里的整个巴黎也产生了效力。

The Place St. Sulpice, so quiet and deserted, where toward midnight there came every night the woman with the busted umbrella and the crazy veil; every night she slept there on a bench under her torn umbrella, the ribs hanging down, her dress turning green, her bony fingers and the odor of decay oozing from her body; and in the morning I'd be sitting there myself, taking a quiet snooze in the sunshine, cursing the goddamned pigeons gathering up the crumbs everywhere. St. Sulpice! The fat belfries, the garish posters over the door, the candles flaming inside. The Square so beloved of Anatole France, with that drone and buzz from the altar, the splash of the fountain, the pigeons cooing, the crumbs disappearing like magic and only a dull rumbling in the hollow of the guts. Here I would sit day after day thinking of Germaine and that dirty little street near the Bastille where she lived, and that buzz buzz going on behind the altar, the buses whizzing by, the sun beating down into the asphalt and the asphalt working into me and Germaine, into the asphalt and all Paris in the big fat belfries.

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Editor:wwlcj1982  【论坛讨论】【收藏此页】【手机阅读】【打印】【英语词典 载入中...
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